Advertisement:


Tips for Using Shutter Speed

Upgrading from a digital camera to a DSLR comes with many new features, unfortunately, these features can seem daunting and difficult to use. However, mastering these elements will allow you to become an exponentially better photographer. This blog discusses shutter speed, and how to properly use it. Shutter speed is the length of time a camera's shutter is open to allow light onto the digital sensor. While the shutter is open the camera has to be completely still, so unless the shutter speed is incredibly high, a tripod or something to rest the camera on is needed. This article contains 5 tips to help you adjust to the shutter speed setting.


Changing Shutter Speeds

The difficult part of using shutter speed is knowing which speed to use depending on the light, and the subject. However, actually adjusting your shutter speed is surprisingly easy. When changing your shutter speed keep in mind that you will also have to adjust your aperture or ISO to keep up with these changes. To optimize your photos, try playing around with the 3 features to try and create a unique picture.


Action Shots

For action shots you must make sure your shutter speed is fast, allowing you still maintain detail while taking incredibly quick photos. Depending on the subject you will have to play around with settings to avoid blurring. When capturing pictures at a very high shutter speed you will have to make offsetting moves with aperture and ISO. Since the shutter is open for such a small amount of time, not much light will be let in, causing photos to seem dark. Increasing ISO will allow for the more light to be let in.


Weather & ISO

ISO is the indication of how sensitive a film is to light, meaning that the lower the setting, the darker the photo, and the higher the setting, means a lighter photo. This has to be changed accordingly with shutter speed, the faster the shutter the more sensitive the film has to be too light, to prevent the picture from being too dark. The weather also directly affects this, the brighter it is, the lower your ISO should be. However, if it's cloudy, the ISO should be at a higher setting, especially if the shutter speed is increased.


Panning

This is a creative way to use shutter speed settings to give the feeling of movement within your pictures. This is don't by moving the camera during exposure to track the subject. If executed properly the subject is in focus and clear, while the background is blurred. This is easiest to accomplish at slower shutter speeds, between 1/8 and 1/30 of a second.

Advertisement:


Long Exposure

This is when you keep the shutter open for long stretches of time, upwards of 20 seconds, using a remote shutter release is probably needed however, as pressing the button may cause the camera to move which will result in camera shake. This shows movement in the picture, and is especially breathtaking around moving water.



-- article by Marc Bowler



articles
articles
gear
gear
flows
House
contact
contact